Category: Plants with Sam

Plants with Sam: Swiss Cheese Plant

Mar 10, 2020 by Sam Taylor

Hi! Sam here with our latest issue of Plants with Sam, a blog about plants and how to take care of them. I am writing this series to go hand in hand with CrossRealms’ Let’s Grow initiative. My first post with more details can be found here.

Today I would like to talk about the Swiss Cheese Plant – More commonly known as Monstera Deliciosa. This is my favorite plant that I own because they get so big and gorgeous as they mature. It is also known as the Mexican Breadfruit, in reference to its corn cob-shaped fruit (which is said to taste like a combination of pineapple, banana, and mango)

A Monstera’s uniquely shaped leaves allow it to withstand downpours in tropical rainforests. Its structure also helps it take in the few streaks of sunlight that make it to the rain forest floor.

Light

Bright, indirect sunlight is fine for the Swiss Cheese Plant, but harsh sun needs to be avoided as it will scorch and possibly yellow the leaves. Make sure it is getting enough light, otherwise the "Swiss cheese effect" will start to disappear and it will start to produce leaves without holes.

Water

Only moderate levels of watering are required here. When you do water make sure you aim to get all of the compost evenly moist, then wait until it has almost dried out before watering again.

Temperature

Visible new growth will show whenever temperatures are regularly at 65°F or above. Although it will survive easily between 50°F - 86°F try to keep in the middle of this where possible to avoid temperature related problems.

Fertilizer

Feeding is essential if you want new, lush green growth. Use any houseplant feed and use it it at normal strength no more than once a month during periods of active growth. Reduce the amount and frequency of feed if you're finding your plant is becoming a monster and outgrowing its home too fast!

Humidity

It will take average to high humidity levels well, but will start to suffer if things are very dry for prolonged periods. Find ways that work for you to increase humidity if this is likely to be an issue in the spot you have chosen for it.

If you follow these plant care tips, your Monstera will be happy and healthy. Don't forget to stay tuned for more plant care tips!

Plants with Sam: Golden Pothos

Nov 8, 2019 by Sam Taylor

Hi, Sam here with our latest issue of Plants with Sam, a blog about plants and how to take care of them. I am writing this series to go hand in hand with CrossRealms’ Let’s Grow initiative. My first post with more details can be found here.

Today I would like to talk about the Golden Pothos. The Golden Pothos is known by many other names, including Devil’s Ivy, because it is impossible to kill. These houseplants are very fast growing so they can be extremely rewarding for beginners.

Golden Pothos are trailing plants so many people put them in hanging baskets, letting them drop towards the ground. You could allow it to climb on a trellis or a stand as well.

Golden Pothos are perfect friendship plants. They are extremely easy to propagate so many people will take cuttings and give them to their loved ones. Just cut it with scissors right below a node, and stick it in water for a while. It takes almost no time for your plant to start growing new roots! Once it has plenty of roots, it will be able to be transplanted into soil. You can also choose to leave it in water for as long as you want, they will thrive pretty much anywhere.

Here are a few tips on how to keep your Golden Pothos plant healthy:

Light

They do well in bright, indirect light, and can handle low light as well. If your pothos is variegated with white, it might not grow as well in low light, or it could start to lose its variegation after a while and become mostly green.

Water

Any well draining houseplant soil will work fine for a Golden Pothos, or no soil at all if you choose to plant in water.

Temperature

Golden Pothos will be happiest in temperatures between 60-85 degrees Fahrenheit. It can survive occasional chills down to 50 degrees, but it will die if it gets any colder than that.

Fertilizer

Golden Pothos will prosper if they are given a balanced houseplant fertilizer once a month with their watering.

Humidity

Golden Pothos prefer the average household humidity during summer. Think of adding some misting or a humidifier in the winter if your house gets really dry.

If you follow these plant care tips, your Golden Pothos will be happy and healthy. Don't forget to stay tuned for more plant care tips!

Plants with Sam: ZZ Plants

Nov 8, 2019 by Sam Taylor
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Hi, Sam here with our latest issue of Plants with Sam! This blog talks about plant care and how to best care for your leafy friends. I am writing this to go hand in hand with CrossRealms’ Let’s Grow initiative. To read more about this, my first post with more details can be found here. 

Today I would like to talk about the ZZ plant. Zamioculcas zamiifolia is it’s full name. This is another houseplant that is very popular amongst new plant owners, due to the fact that it’s hard to kill.

ZZ plants are known for their waxy leaves that reflect light, as well as the interesting pattern the leaves grow in. It is said that the ZZ can help purify the air of toxins as well.

ZZ plants, like the other two plants previously mentioned in this blog, will be fine if neglected. They are drought tolerant and can live in low light without putting up a fight. Although they are notoriously slow growers, these plants can grow to be about 3 feet tall and wide so they won’t completely take over your living room like some others can.

Here are a few tips on how to keep your ZZ plant healthy:

Light

The ZZ can survive in almost any kind of light, aside from full sun or absolutely no light. I would suggest moderate indirect light to keep it happy.

Water

Let the soil dry out completely between waterings, I only water mine about twice a month. These plants could become easily susceptible to root rot or rhizome rot due to its thick stems.​

Soil

Most houseplant soils will work fine for the ZZ, as long as they’re fairly quickly draining. If the water sits too long it could start to rot, so try to add some sand or perlite if that happens. ​

Temperature

Average house temperature is fine for the ZZ, between 60 and 75 degrees fahrenheit would be best. Don’t let the temperature drop below 45 degrees.​

Fertilizer

Average house temperature is fine for the ZZ, between 60 and 75 degrees fahrenheit would be best. Don’t let the temperature drop below 45 degrees.​

Plants with Sam: Spider Plants

Jul 16, 2019 by Sam Taylor

Hi, it’s Sam with the next segment of Plants with Sam! If you’re a little late to the plant party, my first post with more details about this blog series and why I’m doing it can be found here. 

 

Today I would like to talk about the spider plant. These plants are pretty popular for two reasons: they’re super easy to take care of, and given the right conditions, they produce babies like crazy!

 

I got my own spider plant from a friend, and it was a baby from one of her main plants. The way this works is if the conditions are right (lots of light and warm temperatures, as well as a snug pot), they will send out a shoot from the middle of the plant and at the end of that shoot, a miniature spider plant will grow. It’s best to wait until the tiny spider plant is starting to grow its own roots, then you can just pinch it off and stick it in the soil!

Here are some tips and tricks that will help you care for your spider plant:

Light

Spider plants prefer nice, bright light, but they will also be alright in lower light conditions.

Water

They don’t need water too often, just about every other week or so. Let the soil dry out completely in between waterings. If your water has a lot of salts or minerals in it, it would be best to use distilled water or rainwater.

Soil

Most soils that drain quickly work fine for these plants. It’s best to use soils that don’t have a lot of fertilizer in them.

Temperature

Spider plants like it a bit on the warmer side, so it’s best to keep the temperature between 70 and 90 degrees Fahrenheit. They will survive in temperatures as low as 35 degrees, but they will not grow much if the temperature is under 65.

Fertilizer

Less is more when it comes to fertilizer for spider plants. Use a diluted houseplant fertilizer in spring and summer.

If you follow these tips, your spider plant will have no issues being happy and healthy! Don’t forget to stay tuned for more plant care tips!

Plants with Sam: Snake Plants

Jul 16, 2019 by Sam Taylor

Hi, Sam here with the latest installment of Plants with Sam! As a reminder, I’m starting a new blog series on the care of plants to complement CrossRealms’ Let’s Grow initiative. My first post with more details can be found here.

 

Today I would like to talk about the snake plant. The snake plant is a part of the Sansevieria family and another common nickname for it is mother-in-law’s tongue.

 

Sansevierias are perfect plants for those who tend to be forgetful, and don’t always water their plants. I just recently got one of my own and love the way it looks. We have one in the office as well. They can grow to be pretty large so they make great floor plants when they are older.

 

Snake plants are very tolerant and can survive most conditions, including low levels of light, as well as drought and just being ignored in general.

Although it is easy to care for, here are a few tips and tricks to keep your snake plant happy:

Light

While sansevierias can handle any light and can handle low light or full sun, it is best to give it indirect light.

Water

Because snake plants are considered succulents, they can be very susceptible to rot. It’s best to not water too often, and barely any water at all during the winter. Try to let the soil dry out completely between waterings.

Soil

Most soils that drain quickly would work fine for these plants, but since they originate from the desert, sandier soils will work best.

Temperature

Temperatures between 55 and 85 degrees Fahrenheit are best. Anything below 50 will damage the plant.

Fertilizer

Feed with a mild cactus fertilizer once during the growing season or a balanced liquid slow-release (10-10-10 fertilizer) diluted to half-strength. Don't fertilize in the winter.

If you follow these tips, your snake plant will have no issues being happy and healthy! Don’t forget to stay tuned for more plant care tips!

PLANTS WITH SAM

Jul 11, 2019 by Sam Taylor

My name is Sam Taylor and I’m the marketing specialist at CrossRealms. In addition to this role, I’m also a plant mom! Welcome to my new blog series.

I started my plant collection a couple of years ago and at the moment I have about 30 houseplants in my home, as well as a vegetable and herb garden on my deck. I killed quite a few plants when I first got into this hobby but learned a lot as time went on. Some plants are a lot harder to take care of than others, and I learned that each plant has its own specific needs when it comes to light, temperature, humidity, pot size, fertilization, and watering. My favorite part of taking care of plants is watching them grow and transform once you’ve figured out how to make them happy.

CrossRealms is starting a new initiative called Let’s Grow and as part of this initiative, we will be giving our current and potential clients plants in a CrossRealms self-watering planter. I chose some plants that are better for beginners to take care of, mostly because it’s never fun to receive a beautiful plant as a gift and have it die a week later. We believe that plants make the ideal gift, not just because they look nice in your home or office, but because as you take care of it, you literally and figuratively cultivate growth, and we at CrossRealms want to be a part of that growth.

To complement this initiative, I am starting a blog series around the care of plants in and outside of your home. I can’t wait to share with you my tips, tricks, and knowledge. Stay tuned for more plant-powered posts!